Seattle’s TEDxRainier 2011 Conference

Sue's TEDx Rainier notes, page 2
One page of my sketchbook notes from the TEDx Rainier Conference

Heading off the island Friday evening we are full of anticipation about tomorrow’s TEDx Rainier event. This year’s theme is Gained in Translation: Ideas Crossing Frontiers, featuring over twenty five speakers whose ideas and extraordinary work span across domains and fuel innovations and insights. Followers of TED for years online, this is our first live experience.

Earlier on Friday I received a book I had ordered from Amazon – An Illustrated Life: Drawing Inspiration from the Private Sketchbooks of Artists, Illustrators and Designers by Danny Gregory. I couldn’t wait to get on the ferry with no distractions and go through the book slowly, page by page.

An Illustrated Life, cover
click on book for more info

As Gregory says in the introduction, “a book full of sketchbooks and illustrated journals from all sorts of people who love nothing better than to hunch over a little book and fill its pages with lines and colors”. This treasure of a book has 78 five star reviews out of 84… it is stupendous with creativity overflowing tremendously inspiring.

This was just the creative jumpstart I needed and somewhere along the way from home to Seattle the idea was born to capture the essence of each talk creatively in my sketchbook on two facing pages. So I arrived with Jay at the Conference Saturday morning with sketchbook and pen in hand. The first few moments I had some self-consciousness as the first speaker began… where and how to begin, is anyone watching me??? All the usual fears. Fortunately, I was able to move through the fear, pick a starting spot, realize everyone is mesmerized by the speakers (not me) and plunge into it. By the third speaker there was no looking back, I was totally hooked on my project.

Sue's TEDx Rainier notes, page 1
My second page of sketchbook notes from the TEDx Rainier Conference

Jay & I enjoyed many of the speakers, some of the highlights included:

  • Rick Steves‘ frank talk about how global travel brings us together, saying “Fear is for people that don’t get out much.” Rick is a world traveler and author of over 80 very readable helpful books on travel.
  • Amory Lovins on Reinventing Fire – how to transition to zero carbon clean renewable energy by 2050… I liked his quote – “Not all the fossils are in the fuel.”
  • Peter Blomquist on being humbled in his encounters with the kindness of simple traditional cultures. Peter is principal of Blomquist International, focused on organizational development, philanthropy, and global engagement. His words of wisdom – enter humbly, stay for tea, listen and learn.
  • ITGirl librarian Chrystie Hill on how libraries are transforming and evolving in the new world. When kids were asked what they would like in a library where everything is allowed, one replied – to hear the sounds of the forest as I approach the books about trees.
  • Leroy Hood on how insights from the human Genome project are bringing fundamental advances in early diagnosis and treatment of disease. P4 Medicine is his belief – predictive, preventative, personal and participatory.
  • Pediatrician Dimitri Christakis on how focusing on the first year of a child’s development can have stunning effects on the potential of the child, for the rest of life. Dr. Christakis is author of The Elephant in the Living Room: Make Television Work for Your Children.
  • Jenn Lim on happiness. Jenn Lim is the CEO and Chief Happiness Officer of Delivering Happiness, a company that she and Tony Hsieh (CEO of Zappos) co-created in 2010 to inspire happiness in work, community and everyday life.
  • Adnan Mahmud on “Climbing the ladder that matters.” Adnan tells his story about how he came to create Jolkona, a nonprofit that helps people raise large amounts of money through small donation, and receive proof of how the donations helped make a difference for those in need.
  • The three  Interfaith Amigos, Pastor Don McKenzie, Rabbi Ted Falcon, and Imam Jamal Rahman on religious discord, and how to get along. Their presentation received a standing ovation. It was at once funny, touching and brimming with promise and hope. Their new book is Religion Gone Astray: What We Found at the Heart of Interfaith.

For both of us, the most powerful talk was given by photographic artist Chris Jordan. Jordan, a former corporate lawyer, explores the detritus of mass culture, using photographs and images to, at a gut level, convey the impact we are having on the earth. Earlier this year we saw his exhibit – Running the Numbers – at the University of Oregon’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in  Eugene, OR.

Let’s see I’ve covered the Travel, Sketch, Write areas… now we get to the part about doing all this while eating gluten-free. This trip to Seattle we experienced two new restaurants. Both casual, affordable, gluten-free friendly and yummy.

Friday night we had a late dinner at Uneeda Burger. Located in Seattle’s Fremont neighborhood, Uneeda Burger is a casual, roadside-style burger shack with seriously delicious burgers. I had the lamb burger special on a gluten-free bun with a side of spicy sweet potato fries while Jay splurged and went with the Whidbey Island Crescent Harbor 100% Wagyu (Kobe) grass-fed beef (additional $3) with caramelized onions, watercress and blue cheese. Both were deliciously juicy and messy and enjoyed with one of their craft-brewed beers. Not a beef eater, not to worry, they have chicken and veggie options.

Saturday at our lunch break two of the student volunteers at TEDx Rainier suggested we try Shultzys. Nothing better than to walk into a busy restaurant and find a quiet seat near the fireplace on a rainy fall day. Jay tried the “Schultzy”, a char-grilled sausage burger made with mild Italian pork, served on a toasted, garlic-buttered roll with grilled onions & peppers – very good subtle flavors. I had the Bratwurst, a mild but nicely spiced pork and beef sausage, served with grilled onions & sauerkraut. Easily gluten-free by eliminating the bun. Very tasty. The service was prompt and our food came quickly which we appreciated given our limited time.  Seattle’s Wurst Restaurant is located at 4114 University Way NE.

I end with a tip from my sweet husband… Looking for an idea for taking your sweetie out on a date? Go to a TED conference. Ideas are hot! Follow up the conference with a nice dinner, in a quiet romantic place, and prepare to have some great conversation. TED talks will inspire, enlighten, and fill you with hope.

Cincinnati, OH and Covington, KY too

Ohio River, Cincinnati, Ohio
View of the Ohio River from Cincinnati with the lights of Covington, Ky just over the bridge.

Experience, travel – these are as education in themselves” ~ Euripides, Greek playwright, c. 480-406 BC. In the ancient tradition of traveling across lands, I find myself stimulated and curious to learn about each area we are driving through or stopping to visit as we traverse the country.

Sitting with our friends on their balcony this first evening in downtown Cincinnati, watching the barges maneuver past each other on the river, we start talking about the Ohio River’s history. During the Civil War the Ohio River, which forms the southern border of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, was part of the border between free states and slave states. “Sold down the river” was a phrase used by Upper South slaves, especially from Kentucky, who were shipped by way of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to cotton and sugar plantations in the Deep South. On the flip side, before and during the Civil War, the Ohio River was called the “River Jordan” by slaves crossing it to escape to freedom in the North via the Underground Railroad. Some research reveals that more escaping slaves, estimated in the thousands, made the perilous journey north to freedom across the Ohio River than anywhere else across the north-south frontier. Harriet Beecher Stowe’s best-selling novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, portrayed such escapes across the Ohio and fueled abolitionist work.

Pendleton Art Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
Pendleton Art Center, Cincinnati, Ohio

Cincinnati is home to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center located at 50 East Freedom Way. Their mission is to reveal stories about freedom’s heroes, from the era of the Underground Railroad to contemporary times, challenging and inspiring everyone to take courageous steps for freedom today.

And while we are on the topic, for those of you who are bicyclists, The Underground Railroad Bicycle Route (UGRR) honors the bravery of those who fled bondage and those who provided shelter. The route passes points of interest and historic sites along a 2,008-mile corridor. Beginning in Mobile, Alabama – a busy port for slavery during the pre-civil war era – the route goes north following rivers through Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Kentucky. Waterways, as well as the North Star, were often used by freedom seekers as a guide in their journeys to escape slavery. Upon crossing into Ohio, the route leaves the river to head toward Lake Erie and enters Canada at the Peace Bridge near Buffalo, New York. In Ontario, the route follows the shores of Lake Ontario and ends at Owen Sound, a town founded by freedom seekers in 1857.

Now, back to Cincinnati. Our friend, Judith Serling-Sturm, is a book artist and hand binder who has her studio in the Pendleton Art Center. Judith creates custom books – designing covers with leather, textiles, and artisan-made papers from around the world. Visiting her studio we are fascinated by the exposed bindings and book covers embedded with natural elements, semi-precious stones, and found objects.

Judith Serling-Sturm Book Art
One of Judith Serling-Sturm's handmade books from her "Bill of Rights" art piece.

Built in 1909 for a shoe company, the Pendleton Art Center is now home to over 200 artists. As we walk up the stairs to the eighth story, the building’s history is revealed in the original pine floors, tall arched windows, ancient radiators and fine old doors. Visitors are welcome to studio walks on the Final Friday of each month from 6 to 10pm.

Findlay Market, Cincinnati, Ohio
Findlay Market, Cincinnati, Ohio
Butcher in Cincinnati's Findlay Market
Charles Bare Meats in Cincinnati's Findlay Market

Never missing an opportunity to eat, we head to Findlay Market for lunch. In operation since 1855, this is Ohio’s oldest continuously operating public market. First stop is Pho Lang Thang for a bowl of Pho (Vietnamese noodle soup), and then a cruise around the market checking out the many year-round merchants. Meat, tea, cheese, gelato, wine, fish and seafood… at Colonel De’s we find Raz Al Hanout, a Moroccan blend of spices that Jay enjoys cooking with… and at Dean’s Mediterranean Imports we buy a delicious Fig jam with sesame seeds and anise seed. Dojo Gelato seriously tempts us as we leave the market but still full from lunch and with dinner reservations at Lavomatic Cafe we walk on by.

Colonel De Gourmet Herbs & Spices in Findlay Market
Colonel De Gourmet Herbs & Spices in Findlay Market

Next, knowing Jay’s love of music, Judith takes us over the Roebling Suspension Bridge to Covington, Kentucky to visit Cymbal House. Located at 524 Main Street in downtown Covington. As you can see in the photo this is a gorgeous, highly efficient space. We walk in as a well-seasoned local jazz musician is carefully listening to various cymbals.

The owner is very friendly and explains to me that the size of the cymbal affects its sound, larger cymbals usually being louder and having longer sustain. Heavier cymbals (measured by thickness) have a louder volume, more cut, and better drum stick articulation. Thin cymbals have a fuller sound, a lowered pitch, and faster response. The jazz musician tells us he will be performing just down the street from Cymbal House at Chez Nora – A Rooftop Terrace Bar and Jazz Club. They offer live music five nights a week and spectacular views of downtown Cincinnati and the scenic Ohio River.

Owner of Cymbal House, Covington, Kentucky
Proud owner of Cymbal House in Covington, Kentucky
Main Street, Covington, Kentucky
Main Street, Covington, Kentucky

For dinner we drive to Over-the-Rhine, sometimes shortened to OTR, a neighborhood in Cincinnati, Ohio. It is believed to be the largest, most intact urban historic district in the United States. Over-the-Rhine was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983 and contains the largest collection of Italianate architecture in the United States. Its architectural significance has been compared to the French Quarter in New Orleans, the historic districts of Savannah, Georgia and Charleston, South Carolina, and Greenwich Village in New York City. Besides being a historic district, the neighborhood has an arts community that is unparalleled within Cincinnati.

Lavomatic Cafe, Cincinnati, Ohio
Welcome to Lavomatic Cafe, Cincinnati, Ohio

Our destination is Lavomatic Cafe, an urban wine bar and restaurant. Blessed with a beautiful evening we chose the rooftop patio for dining. Several of us start with the Seasonal Soup – Gazpacho – made with fresh, local tomatoes and seasoned with smoked paprika. Divine. For dinner, Judy & Peter both chose the Bruschetta Salad with Shrimp, Jay has the Grilled Caesar with Salmon (served with a house bleu cheese dressing), and I decide on the Duck Confit Salad. All delicious and totally enjoyed with a chilled bottle of white wine recommended by our server.

Lavomatic Cafe is a great place to go before or after a show, as it is moments away from Cincinnati Music Hall, The Ensemble Theatre of Cincinnati, The School for the Creative and Performing Arts and Know Theater of Cincinnati.

Our stay was much too brief, so we offer some local tips on dining recommendations from our friend in Cincinnati… thank you Judith!

Casual dining:
Riverside Korean Restaurant, Covington, Ky – fabulous Korean food, extremely reasonable
Lime Taqueria, Covington, Ky – huge organic buritos, inexpensive

Lunch/coffee – inexpensive:
Melt – eclectic deli, organic, vegetarian friendly – casual backyard seating – Cincinnati, Northside neighborhood
Coffee Emporium – great locally roasted coffee and best black bean burgers in Cincinnati, Over-the-Rhine
Iris Book Cafe – local sources, vegan friendly, wonderful courtyard in historic Over-the-Rhine

Lunch and/or dinner – moderately priced:
Nectar – seasonal cuisine, casual backyard patio in Mt Lookout, Cincinnati (Best Restaurant 2011)
Honey – farm to table, Northside neighborhood, Cincinnati (Best Restaurant 2011)
Cumin – eclectic world cuisine, Hyde Park neighborhood, Cincinnati (Best Restaurant 2011)
Jean-Roberts Table – casual French, downtown Cincinnati (Best New Restaurant 2011)

Fine Dining:
Daveeds at 934 – farm to table, Mt Adams neighborhood, Cincinnati (Best Restaurant 2011)
Nicola’s Ristorante – Italian – Cincinnati, Over-the-Rhine (Best Restaurant 2011)
Boka – Italian, Mt Oaklet, Cincinnati, but moving downtown (Best Restaurant 2011)

Visit Cincinnati Magazine on Best Restaurants 2011 to read their impressions of the award winners, and visit Livin’ in the “Cin” the official travel blog for Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky.

Pit Stop in Rapid City, South Dakota

Alex Johnson Hotel, Rapid City, SD
Warm, welcoming lobby of the Alex Johnson Hotel in Rapid City, SD

Mid-day we make a pit stop in Rapid City looking for wireless service, lunch, a natural foods store… and architecturally interesting buildings.

Right downtown and an easy drive from the Crazy Horse Memorial and Mount Rushmore, The Hotel Alex Johnson is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The structural design is a blend of two spirits: the heritage of the Plains Indians and the Germanic Tudor architecture representing German immigration to the Dakotas. Construction began on the hotel in 1927, the day before work began on Mount Rushmore. Alex Johnson, Vice President of the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad, was founder of this grand hotel that bears his name. An admirer of Native Americans, he spoke of a shrine and tribute to the Sioux Indian Nation.

After admiring the lobby and buying a few postcards in the gift shop, we walk into Seattle’s Best Cafe, which is conveniently connected to the hotel. Good coffee, hot tea, comfy leather chairs for postcard writing, and complimentary high speed wireless take care of all our needs.

Tally's Silver Spoon, Rapid City, SD
Tally's Silver Spoon fine diner is just across the street from the hotel.

Tally’s Silver Spoon, dubbed the Fine Diner by Chef Benjamin Klinkel, and located across the street from the hotel, is what drew us to the town after an internet search. The diner is abuzz with happy eaters and we are pleased to land a booth by the window. The menu reflects the chef’s philosophy of seeking out the best ingredients available, local whenever possible and specialty imports from small producers all over the world.

Healthy choices are created daily in the form of the Silver Spoon Lunch Special made with lettuces and produce grown specifically for Tally’s Silver Spoon by a local farm. Jay orders today’s lunch special – a Tuscan Bread salad with seared Ahi Tuna on top. I order a Wild Idea Buffalo burger a plate they happily modify to be gluten-free – omitting the bun and coated fries and adding a delicious green salad. Both are delicious. Wild Idea, a Rapid City company, lets their bison mature on native grass pastures which are are loaded with Omegs-3’s and are found in abundance in grass-fed buffalo.

Fully fed and satisfied we locate a natural foods store. I find it interesting to go into natural food markets in different places. Often we will be restocking on nuts and fruit and I like to see what gluten-free brands they carry that are new to me. Today we check out Staple and Spice Market at 601 Mount Rushmore Road. My discovery is a new line of gluten-free baking mixes from Stonewall KitchenGF Chocolate Chunk Cookie Mix, GF Chocolate Cupcake Mix, GF Vanilla Cupcake Mix, GF Pancake & Waffle Mix, and a GF Chocolate Brownie Mix. I purchased one of the brownie mixes and look forward to baking it soon. If anyone has tried the Stonewall gluten-free mixes, please let us know what you think.

Yellowstone National Park

We enter Yellowstone National Park through the western gate, and we are immediately entranced. Wild elk graze beside a pristine creek. This park is nature’s church. It is a holy place that is sacred to all who visit. Though the park is visited by millions, there is no sign of litter that abounds in many tourist destinations. Visitors know they are guests in this spectacular natural place.

Yellowstone National Park volcanic pool
Yellowstone National Park volcanic pool

Yellowstone is America’s first national park. Located mostly in Wyoming, with edges that peak in to Montana and Idaho, it has inspired the creation of parks throughout the world. Named by indians that inhabited the region, the yellow stone mountains that rise throughout the park cradle wondrous sights.

Formed by an upwelling of magma, a mountain-rimmed caldera provides curious hints of the tremendous heat below. Though the Old Faithful geyser is the iconic symbol of the park, there are many other signature signs of the Yellowstone’s volcanic legacy – mud pots, bubbling mineral pools, steaming mineral springs surrounded by rainbow colored calcium deposits, built up over millennia…

The National Park Service says it well:

Yellowstone National Park volcanic geyser
Yellowstone National Park volcanic geyser

“Rather than to preserve bears, wolves, bison or its myriad of streams, valleys and mountains, Yellowstone was designated as a National Park in 1872 to preserve and protect its more than 10,000 unique thermal features, the largest collection on the planet, spread throughout the park’s 2.2 million acres.”

“With half of the earth’s geothermal features, Yellowstone holds the planet’s most diverse and intact collection of geysers, hot springs, mudpots, and fumaroles. Its more than 300 geysers make up two thirds of all those found on earth. Combine this with more than 10,000 thermal features comprised of brilliantly colored hot springs, bubbling mudpots, and steaming fumaroles, and you have a place like no other. Geyserland, fairyland, wonderland–through the years, all have been used to describe the natural wonder and magic of this unique park that contains more geothermal features than any other place on earth.”

Yellowstone National Park volcanic mud
Yellowstone National Park volcanic mud pot

Hearing that temperatures are dipping into the 30’s at night, we decide to book a room at the Old Faithful Inn. Built in the winter of 1903 -1904, the Inn is one of a few remaining log hotels in the country. Designed by the architect Robert Reamer (also designed the Martin Woldson Theater in Spokane) who wanted the asymmetry of the building to reflect the chaos of nature, the Old Faithful Inn is an outstanding work of rustic architecture. The building is a rustic log and wood-frame structure of huge proportions – almost 700 feet in length and seven stories high. Entering into the lobby we feel like we are stepping back in time. Our room is in a section built in the 1920s – probably remodeled since then – simple, clean and comfortable. The Inn has a full service restaurant where we dine for dinner and breakfast.

Old Faithful Inn touring car
Vintage touring car outside the Old Faithful Inn
Old Faithful Inn
Old Faithful Inn - view from the lobby
Old Faithful Inn lobby door
Old Faithful Inn lobby door

Next day we enjoy a hike up to Trout Lake in the northeast section of the park. A steep 1/2 mile trail leads to the beautiful lake. As we step across a stream feeding the lake, a large trout glides through the crystal clear water, glistening in the high country sun.

Trout Lake in Yellowstone National Park
Trout Lake in Yellowstone National Park

Here are some of the best rated trail guides for Yellowstone and the Grand Teton range:

Yellowstone National Park buffalo
Our close encounter with a buffalo as we drive to the northeast exit of the park

Butte, Montana

Mine frames, Butte, MT
Mine "head frames" dot the landscape in Butte, Montana
Butte, MT garage door
Old garage door

In its heyday, from the late 19th century to about 1920, Butte was one of the largest and most notorious copper boomtowns in the West, with a maze of over 10,000 miles of mines beneath it’s surface. As was common in the early wild west, Butte was home to hundreds of saloons and a famous red-light district. The documentary Butte, America depicts its history as a copper producer and the issues of labor unionism, economic rise and decline, and environmental degradation that resulted from the activity.

During the mining boom, Butte’s population rose to over 100,000, as it became the largest city west of the Mississippi. Now, while most American cities have gown, Butte’s population has contracted to less than 35,000.

Copper King Mansion
Copper King Mansion is under renovation.
Butte, Montana historic house
Historic home across from the Copper King Mansion

Strolling around the town, the streets are wide, roomy, and curiously quiet. In Butte’s lovely historic neighborhoods, you could put a couch out in the middle of the street and sit there for a couple days and get a good nap in. Which is exactly what was depicted in Wim Winder’s excellent film – Don’t Come Knocking – starring Sam Shepard and Jessica Lange. In a humorous touching moment, Shepard pulls a discarded couch out into the street, sits down, and for many hours, simply sits and contemplates his life. All the while, Wender’s keen-eyed Director of Photography, Franz Lustig, captures the beauty of Butte as the scene unwinds through morning, to evening, to night. It is a seminal moment in the film, and beautifully captures the quiet of Butte, as the city takes a rest from all that went before.

Curtis Music Hall building, Butte, MT
The old Curtis Music Hall building
Piccadilly Museum of Transportation, Butte, Montana
Piccadilly Museum of Transportation
Arts Chateau, Butte, MT
Arts Chateau

Our stay in Butte is brief. Arriving late, we find a room at the Hampton Inn – very comfortable, clean, and spacious. The next morning, before hitting the highway to Yellowstone, we do a driving tour of downtown Butte.

When you visit Butte and it’s older sections, much of its history can be seen in the buildings – the ornate stone architecture and fading old fashioned billboards on the stone-walled businesses.

We center ourselves in the historic heart of the city and begin to stroll. This is a great walking town. Traffic is light, and the layout is easy to navigate. Every block holds something of interest – old banks, butcher, bookstores, restaurants, pubs, music venues – all of it built from stone mined beneath Butte.

As we walk, we keep a lookout for the art gallery where Jessica Lange slugged Sam Shepard with her purse in the movie in Don’t Come Knocking.

Looking for an iced tea, we ask a local, who suggests The Venus Rising Espresso House. Turns out this is the local coffee house owned and operated by the Butte Silver Bow Arts Foundation. Good tea, good cause.

Preparing for our camping trip to Yellow Stone National Park in Wyoming, and Bear Butte in South Dakota, we pick up some supplies at the well-stocked Bob Ward’s sporting goods store. I could spend an hour in this place, squeezing between tightly packed rows of clothing, fly fishing gear, boating, camping furniture, shoes, … Finding what we need, at a good price, we set out for Yellow Stone National Park.

Historic Wallace, Idaho

creekside camping, Coeur D'Alene, Idaho
Relaxing in the quiet of the morning

After a surprisingly good nights sleep in our CRV camper we resume the drive east. Driving along Interstate 90, about 45 minutes past Coeur D’Alene, we decide to check out historic Wallace, Idaho. What a delightful surprise. The entire town is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and whole blocks in the business district have remained virtually intact for a hundred years or more.

Historic Smoke House BBQ and Saloon
Historic Smoke House BBQ and Saloon

Located in the silver mining area of northern Idaho, mining began here in the 1880’s and by 1900 Wallace became the hub of one of the world’s richest mining districts. Since 1884, the district had produced 1.2 billion ounces of silver. Miners still mine the mountains for silver and today old mines are being reopened.

Red Light Garage in Wallace, Idaho
Red Light Garage in Wallace, Idaho
red light garage, wallace, idaho
Red Light Garage proprietor, Jamie Baker

Thirsty after walking around town, the Red Light Garage catches our eye. A very friendly waitress makes us Arnold Palmers (iced tea and lemonade) as we sit at the counter and take in the collections (vintage musical instruments, license plates…) that decorate the restaurant and antique store. Soon we are talking with the owner, Jamie Baker, who is a local historian. He tells us the story of May Arkwright Hutton a suffrage leader and political activist, talks about the mining wars, and we wind up the conversation with the forest fire of 1910 that burned half of Wallace. Some of you may know the book written about the fire by Timothy Egan – The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire that Saved America. The largest wildfire in American history, based on size. In less than two days, it torched more than three million acres, burned five towns to the ground, and killed nearly one hundred people.

railroad station, Wallace, ID
Northern Pacific Depot Railroad Museum in Wallace, ID

Many stories emerged from the big burn. One of the most well known is Ranger Ed Pulaski’s heroic rescue of his crew in a mine tunnel. Holding his men there at gunpoint overnight, Pulaski managed to save all but 6 of his 45 men. In the 100+ years since the fire, the trail Pulaski’s crew used to escape became overgrown and almost impossible to locate. Then, in 2002, a local group partnered with the US Forest Service  to save the trail and mine site. The Pulaski Tunnel Trail trailhead lies about a half-mile south of Wallace on Moon Pass Road and is a moderately challenging two mile trail along the creek with large format signs along the way recounting the history of the fire.

Dinner in Spokane, WA

Grand Coulee Dam
We pass the Grand Coulee Dam on our way to Spokane, WA

Quite an impressive site from the lookout – the Grand Coulee Dam is a gravity dam on the Columbia River built to produce hydroelectric power and provide irrigation. Constructed between 1933 and 1942, it is the largest electric power-producing facility in the United States, and one of the largest concrete structures in the world.

Spokane means “Children of the Sun” to the Native Americans of the area. Before the 1700’s Native Americans settled along the Spokane River for fishing and hunting in the surrounding area. Spokane became an incorporated City on Nov. 29, 1881, encompassing 1.56 square miles. Tragedy struck in 1889 when a frame building in the downtown area caught fire. There was not enough water pressure at the fire hydrants to put the fire out and the fire burned out of control, ravaging 32 buildings in 27 city blocks. Today the City of Spokane, incorporated more than 125 years ago, is the second largest City in the State of Washington.

The Davenport Hotel
The historic Davenport Hotel in downtown Spokane, WA

The Davenport Hotel has been world famous since it opened in September of 1914. It was the first hotel with air conditioning, a central vacuum system, housekeeping carts (designed by Louis Davenport himself), accordion ballroom doors and Crab Louis (named for Louis Davenport). The September 1915 Hotel Monthly described Louis Davenport as “the man with a vision who created a hotel with a soul.”

The Davenport Hotel faced the wrecking ball in 1987, and remained closed for 15 years. In 2002, local entrepreneurs purchased the entire city block for $6.5 million, then spent the next two years of their lives–and $38 million of their own money–to make The Davenport Hotel grand again. The hotel’s public spaces and ballrooms were restored to their Spanish Renaissance/ French neoclassical glory.

The Davenport Hotel, Spokane, WA
Elegantly restored lobby of the Davenport Hotel in Spokane, WA

If you love architecture and history, you will also want to see the Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox which reopened its doors in November 2007, after a much anticipated renovation. The restoration uncovered original cut-glass stars on the ceiling and murals of swimmers and ballplayers in the men’s lounge. This art deco treasure is now the home of the Spokane Symphony and an incredible venue for all of the performing arts. Built during the dark days of the Depression by Fox West Coast Theaters at a price of $1,000,000, the Theater was the largest in Spokane, at 2300 seats. Architect Robert Reamer, famous for his design of Yellowstone National Park’s Old Faithful Inn, designed the Theater in the exuberant and modernistic Art Deco style.

Now onto dinner. Searching on Google for gluten-free in Spokane, I found the ultimate – a website: Gluten Free Spokane. Eating gluten free in Spokane is not only possible, it can be fabulous. Shallan will help you find your favorite spots to dine out, shop for ingredients and learn more about the benefits of going gluten free.

Tonight we decide to dine at the award winning Wild Sage American Bistro, located downtown at 916 W 2nd Ave. As we sit down in a comfy booth I am presented with a gluten-free menu and gluten-free rolls (believe me this is extraordinary). Jay and I both choose the Wild Sage Burger – half pound american kobe beef on a house made gluten free onion roll served with a beautiful fresh green salad, onion confit, pesto mayo, and local fresh tomatoes. I am in heaven.

Other highlights of the gluten-free menu are Cioppino – spice seared alaskan halibut cheeks, diver scallops, wild prawns, green lip mussels, aromatic saffron-tomato broth, brown rice pasta and for dessert, Soon to be Famous Coconut Cream Layer Cake – gluten-free coconut genoise cake with a mascarpone-coconut cream filling.

A great place to shop for fresh foods and gluten-free foods is Huckleberry’s Natural Market. There are three locations in Spokane, WA. Within the stores is the 9th Street Bistro where all the food is prepared entirely on the premises by their chefs using organic and natural products, whenever possible.

Crossing the North Cascades

Early morning light at the Orcas ferry landing

Up and out early this morning. Catching the 7:15 am ferry from Orcas Island to Anacortes. Today we begin our cross country journey after months, weeks, then days of preparation. We are on the ferry, the car packed with everything we need for five weeks of travel… it’s full. I eye the Westfalia in front of us just a little longingly.

Jay strikes up a conversation with the woman who has rented the Westfalia Van and learns that her husband has a company, Canadian High Tops. A lover of Volkswagen vans, he provides conversion High Tops for VW vans for the years 1980 – 1991.

Driving through the Skagit Valley to Sedro Woolley we begin the scenic mountain drive known as the North Cascades Highway (Route 20). The drive begins through small towns and farmland with the green-blue Skagit River flanking the road. Near Rockport we see a sign for fresh organic blueberries and soon we are pulling into Cascadian Farm. A 28-acre certified organic farm since 1972, this farm was a pioneer in converting conventional farms to organic. Many of us are familiar with their jams but when we walk into the roadside store we go straight for the refrigerator filled with pints of blueberries. Gorgeous, organic and just picked they last about 10 minutes in the car.

Cascadian Farm store on the North Cascade Highway
Cascadian farm organic blueberries

The scenic drive continues through the mountains and ends in Winthrop, WA – a town known for the American Old West design of  its buildings. Our pit stop is in Twisp, another 9 miles along on Route 20. At the Glover Street Market we find some lovely organic greens to go with our tuna-egg salad and enjoy a relaxing picnic in the park.

New York City

Ice pops made from anything brewed: tea, root beer, espresso; markets galore – artisan, farmers, flea, antique; and exploring Brooklyn… here are some fun tips on the big Apple.

New York’s New Frozen Treats

“I HAD never been so grateful to see a banana. Peeled and skewered, just plucked from the freezer, it was nearly smoking from the cold. It was then plunged into molten chocolate, sprinkled with sea salt and slowly twirled under a shower of crushed almonds.”

36 Hours in Brooklyn

Brooklyn, New York City’s most populous borough, is a destination in its own right. Ideas are where to stay, what to do and where to eat.

Markets of New York City: A Guide to the Best Artisan, Farmer, Food, and Flea Markets

markets of new york cityThis lovely little book is a guide to the traditional, charming and edgy markets of New York City: antique and flea markets, artisan markets, farmers’ markets, seasonal markets, and more. Markets of New York City also includes recommendations for great food in and around the markets and suggested routes for full or half-day excursions.

Singapore for business and pleasure

Singapore is one of my favorite cities to visit. Though I generally visit on business, there is always time for pleasure… and Singapore is a fine place to enjoy dining, night life, lush tropical parks, beaches, and shopping.

Singapore River Boat and bridge
Scene along the Singapore River

Singapore’s legendary efficiency is obvious from the first moments after arrival. You will breeze through customs in a matter of seconds, thanks to their embrace of modern technology.  On the way into town from the ultra modern airport, you may note that cars never go over the posted speed limit. The streets are immaculate as they wind through a veritable garden of paradise. Then the city appears ahead – pristine, luminous, shiny and new.

The Fullerton Hotel with River Kids sculpture
Sculpture surrounds The Fullerton Hotel (in the background)

My destination is The Fullerton Hotel in the downtown financial and arts district. The hotel’s Colonial style belies the cool modern interior, welcome in the tropical heat of Singapore. Built in 1928 on the Singapore river, the Fullerton Building was the centre of Singapore’s commercial, social and official life. It was home to three of the most important institutions of Singapore – The General Post Office, The Singapore Club, and The Chamber of Commerce. Even if you don’t stay here, it is worth a visit… there are several excellent restaurants, as well as a first rate international buffet, and a bar that is set amidst the lovely original ceiling and pillars of the old Post Office… and enjoy an evening stroll by the river to enjoy the various sculptures along the way.

Singapore Sculpture Business Men
Fantastic sculpture of business men near the hotel
Singapore Sculpture Three Men
Another fine bronze sculpture in the area

The legendary Raffles Hotel is a short walk away. Immortalized in the novels of Somerset Maugham and Rudyard Kipling, the hotel exemplifies Singapore’s colonial-style architecture amid lush tropical gardens. Go there for tea, drinks, or fine dining – including the Long Bar – home of the world renowned Singapore Sling, and the Tiffin Room, which continues the tradition of Afternoon Tea. The Raffles Hotel Museum looks at the history of the Hotel largely in the context of the Golden Age of Travel. This period, spanning 1880 to 1939, saw the rise of popular tourism and coincided with the opening of the Hotel. This was the era when Singapore was known as the “Crossroads of the East“. Museum hours are 10 am to 7 pm daily. There is no admission charge.

Singapore River Tree
Strolling along the Singapore River

My favorite time to shop is at night, to see buildings adorned with garish signs, and people strolling down the streets, chatting with friends, looking for bargains. Though there are numerous places to shop around downtown, if you are shopping for electronics, cameras, and gadgets, consider heading over to “Little India” – a bustling earthy part of town, where you can let your hair down and haggle with the merchants for the big deal of the day. The various pictures on this blog were taken with a camera I bought in Little India – Nikon Coolpix 8400 8MP Digital Camera with 3.5x 24mm Wide Angle Optical Zoom Lensmy favorite camera, ever!

To fortify you for your evening of wheeling and dealing, follow your nose to one of the wonderful Indian restaurants that are everywhere in Little India. Hidden among the bustle of Little India is Race Course Road . On this tiny lane you will find Banana Leaf Apolohoused in three units of a two-storey shophouse it is most famous for its fish head curry. The restaurant has been open for 30 years, serving both North and South Indian cuisine to locals eager for a taste of great curry, and tourists, like us, who have heard about this a restaurant from an expat friend (thank you Pam!).

Singapore Indian Food
Our feast at the Banana Leaf Apolo

A recent article in the New York Times Travel section, 36 Hours in Singapore, offers up more ideas of things to do and places to stay…

“A long tradition of strong regional cuisine and strict hygiene laws makes for some of the world’s best — and safest — street food. Nowadays most of the hawkers are concentrated in covered food halls so that ingredients are kept cool, and preparation methods and cleanliness can be kept to a uniform standard. At the Maxwell Road Food Center near Chinatown, vendors sell everything from dumplings to onion pancakes to dessert: at Tian Tian (No. 11), try the chicken rice; at Hokee (No. 79), the soup dumplings, and at No. 848, fresh fruit and juice (one, a bitter gourd and honey mix, promises “to reduce heatiness (sic).” Prices are 1 to 8 Singapore dollars.”

Yahoo Travel offers 5 of Singapore’s best restaurants with a view

  • Sky on 57, Level 57 SkyPark Tower 1, Marina Bay Sands Hotel, 10 Bayfront Avenue
  • Level 33, #33-01 Marina Bay Financial Centre Tower 1, 8 Marina Boulevard
  • Barnacles, Rasa Sentosa Resort, 101 Siloso Road
  • Clifford, Fullerton Bay Hotel, 80 Collyer Quay
  • iL Cielo, Level 24, Hilton Singapore, 581 Orchard Road

And the Lonely Planet Singapore (City Travel Guide) gets good reviews as a handy paperback (200 pages) and written in conjunction with a Singapore resident. The expanded coverage of neighborhoods includes two new walking tours and three new excursions; plus helpful cultural insights & local secrets from a comedian, curator, theater director, writer and scholar. If you have access to a computer the content is updated daily at lonelyplanet.com.


Art Exhibits throughout the US in 2011

Norman Rockwell No Swimming
Norman Rockwell's No Swimming

“The secret to so many artists living so long is that every painting is a new adventure. So, you see, they’re always looking ahead to something new and exciting. The secret is not to look back.”

This sentiment by Norman Rockwell relates to travel as well… and we often incorporate a visit to a museum in our travels. American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell is a gem and showing at the Tacoma Art Museum until May 30, 2011. Though there is a comprehensive collection of original magazine covers, we were especially drawn to his 44 paintings – as the museum states “unforgettable images of the innocence, courage, history and hopes of American life in the 20th century.” This is a traveling exhibit that warrants a visit. A good family experience… we took our somewhat reluctant nieces, ages 11 & 14, and they loved it. Future museum hosts are listed at the Norman Rockwell Museum website.

The catalog, American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell, traces the evolution of Rockwell’s art throughout his career – from reflections on childhood innocence in such paintings as No Swimming (1921) to powerful, consciousness-raising images like The Problem We All Live With (1964), which documented the traumatic realities of desegregation in the South.

Promising Exhibitions From Coast to Coast is a great resource article at the New York Times for a list of “promising” art exhibits around the country this year – many of them opening this summer. Here is a sampling:

Support the arts! Visit a museum in your area or in a city you are visiting this year…  it can be enriching, educational and inspiring.


Dining in Paris, France

Paris patisserie
A few years ago in Paris this whimsical lady (and the Patisserie) caught our eye.

From Mark Bittman, a favorite writer at the New York Times, four restaurants in Paris worth taking a Metro ride to…

“… as restaurants in the wealthy and most tourist-laden neighborhoods of Paris have become more crowded and expensive, the areas where one can find a great meal have expanded.

With this in mind, I set out to explore some of the farther-flung alternatives. I concentrated on the increasingly energetic northeast quadrant of the city, namely the 10th, 18th (generally speaking, Montmartre), 19th (around the park of Buttes Chaumont) and 20th (which contains the Belleville neighborhood) Arrondissements.”

Four Paris Restaurants Worth a Metro Ride

His description of Philou in the 10th Arrondissement…

“The food: wonderful, sometimes perfect. Like the marinated sardines with parsley gelée, apples and horseradish. Also wonderful were a dead-on pâté with a jug of cornichons, pork cheeks in a gorgeous dark sauce with celery root cooked in stock (my mouth is watering at the thought of that); a few chunks of insanely good calf’s liver and poularde de Bresse, with meat that was almost as good as the skin, served with Chinese cabbage.”


Astoria, Oregon

Sunday morning… hot tea, New York Times… good article in the travel section on the waterfront town of Astoria, Oregon. Good tips on dining, lodging, and things to do. Enjoy the read and maybe a visit sometime.

Astoria, Oregon, Discovers a Waterfront Chic

Astoria Oregon Waterfront
Cannery Pier Hotel, Astoria, OR (photo credit: Leah Nash for the NY Times)


Eat, drink and find provisions in Eugene, Oregon

eugene oregon restaurant notesHow fortunate are we to be in Eugene, Oregon with a list of food favorites from a friend who knows Eugene!

Restaurants

  • Cafe Soriah a Eugene favorite for almost twenty years, is defined by ancient Mediterranean world spices and the Northwest bounty of ingredients. We visit on a bustling Friday night and both dine on lamb – I have the Lamb Shank, braised in a caramelized onion au jus… it melts in my mouth. Jay chooses the Rack of Lamb, hickory smoked & served with herb aioli… no doubt a hit as Jay consults with the owner about how it is prepared. Good wines by the glass, great service. Lunch is served during the week and dinner is offered every night at 384 West 13th Avenue… check out Prose Dress right next door.
  • Marché takes it’s name from the French word for market — a word that describes not only the location in Eugene’s bustling 5th Street Market, but also their philosophy of cooking. The menu is based on the foods you would find at a farmers market — fresh, seasonal, and regional. Have not eaten here but our friend has heard great things about it and the menus (lunch, dinner and bar) would draw us in next time we are in town. The bar menu is appealing with small plates for the times when your appetite is light or time is tight… think handmade pizzettes, steak & frites, oysters, mussels…
  • The Vintage restaurant and dessert bar is the dream of two childhood girlfriends. Opening in January of 2006 it was voted Best New Restaurant later that year. Located in an old funky house with a great atmosphere it is famous for its cheese and chocolate fondues, sweet & savory crepes and seasonal cocktails. Open Tuesday – Sunday at 837 Lincoln Street.
  • Adam’s Sustainable Table is a casual and family friendly restaurant, serving an eclectic mix of culinary styles – from Northwest Regional to home cookin’ and affordable comfort foods. Farm to table, certified green restaurant that accommodates vegetarian, vegan, gluten-free and dairy-free needs. Located at 30 East Broadway.
  • Pizza Research Institute eclectic pizzas in a funky warehouse setting at 530 Blair Boulevard… Granny smith apples, smoked gouda & roasted walnuts sounds delicious to me, or how about Chevre, marinated eggplant & carmelized onions.
  • Sushi Domo a favorite in Eugene… won Readers Choice for freshest sushi in 2009. They strive to perfect the art of making only the finest sushi and the most delicious delicacies in true Japanese fashion. Located in the Delta Oaks Shopping Mall at 1020 Green Acres Rd. #10.
  • Papas Soul Food Kitchen for BBQ, fried chicken, gumbo and and blues… at 400 Blair Boulevard.

Coffee Shops, Bakeries…

  • Hide Away Bakery as you can see in the note, this is our friends “favorite place to go in Eugene! It’s great for breakfast, coffee/tea, lunch, or a snack. They have a full bakery with organic, gluten-free & vegan options”. Their fabulous breads are sold at the farmers market if you don’t find them at 3377 E Amazon Drive behind Mazzi’s.
  • Wandering Goat is a cafe, coffee roaster, bakery, community, art, music and performance venue. All of their baked goods are vegan, made with organic ingredients, and baked fresh each day. Located at 268 Madison Street, downtown.
  • Sweet Life Patisserie our yoga teachers choice… known for their cakes, pies, cheesecakes and pastries, they also make a fine latte or a pot of organic tea to go with dessert. Expect a line on the weekend at 755 Monroe Street.
  • Vero Espresso House holds court in a big yellow house and as one reviewer said “is one of the most beautiful coffee houses I’ve ever been to”. Comfortable atmosphere to relax and enjoy your coffee from Stumptown Coffee Roasters… 205 East 14th Avenue.
Vero Espresso House Eugene
Vero Espresso House (photo by Brad C via Yelp)
  • Full City Coffee Roasters is a recommendation from yet another friend from Eugene. With over thirty years of roasting/brewing experience they roast their beans each day. Palace Bakery is now part of Full City and bakes all the muffins, scones and “best pumpkin cookie around”. Cafes at 842 Pearl Street and 295 E 13th Avenue.

Food Markets…

  • Sundance Natural Foods features certified organic and local produce. The Kitchen and Deli is all vegetarian, mostly vegan, and features many raw foods entrees. You will find a large selection of bulk, mostly-organic, culinary and medicinal herbs & spices and a bulk foods department. Sundance is affiliated with Sundance Wine Cellars and has a wide selection of Oregon and NW Pinot Noir, and other great NW wines. Single location at 748 E. 24th Avenue.
  • Capella is a neighborhood market with “world class variety” from a produce department stocked full of organic and local fruits & veggies to the meat department with hormone & antibiotic free choices… and Capella Market has a growing selection of gluten-free products. Located on the south side of town at 2489 Willamette.
  • The Kiva is a Eugene original and a few blocks from us so we stop by this small downtown grocery store for some nuts, crackers and snacks. Sandwiches, salads and soups are offered during the day and they have a good selection of local organic produce, meats, cheese and wine. 125 West 11th Avenue in the heart of downtown.
  • Provisions part of the Marché family located at the 5th Street Public Market is an upscale specialty food store with gift baskets, wine, chocolates and sweets. They have a full bakery with organic, gluten-free, and vegan options. Great place to get lunch or a snack!
  • Market of Choice has three locations in Eugene (think Whole Foods) and offers an extensive selection of conventional, natural, organic, and health conscious products at affordable prices. Find new recipes created by their chefs at the website – including a Flourless Chocolate Torte and Curried Apple-Stuffed Pork Loin and Indian Pulao (I substitute gluten-free bread for the challah).

Eugene is a town of neighborhoods with 21 neighborhood associations… In the 1970s, Eugene was packed with cooperative and community projects, and continues to have small natural food stores, cafes and coffee houses in many neighborhoods. According to Wikipedia, Eugene has a significant population of people in pursuit of alternative ideas, and a large original hippie population. Cool. Ready to return!