Seville, Spain – historic bullring

by Sue on February 2, 2015

Statue of bullfighter_newThe Real Maestranza bullring is a landmark in Seville and in Spanish bullfighting.

Bullring and shadows_new

With its impressive Baroque facade, one of the bullring’s most unique features is the slightly oval shape of the ring. This 18th century arena can hold 14,000.

Bullring interior_new

Above the matador’s entrance to the ring is seating for the Royal family.

Matador entrance_new

Heading down to the stables… there are no bulls, horses, or bull fights this time of year.

Heading to stables_new

Stables_new 2

The Chapel dedicated to the Virgen de la Caridad, where matadors pray before entering the ring.

Chapel_new

bull sketch_new

Quick sketch I did from a poster.

 

The Real Maestranza bullring has a small and interesting museum where we learned more about the world of bullfighting through the exhibitions of costumes, photographs, posters, and paintings. Our guide explained that bull fighting has historically been controversial in Spain, and was banned in Barcelona a few years ago.

museum room_new

Antigue poster_new

Finishing up our tour early evening, we went for a walk around that area. Walking around Seville is a pleasure – a feast for the eyes.

Tower_new

Historic tower along the riverfront.

Palm trees_new

Tower and antennae_new

Residential area across the river.

Residential area across the river.

Pasteleria_new

Temptations abound…

Carefully wrapping up our chosen chocolates.

Carefully wrapping up our chosen chocolates.

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Lyn February 2, 2015 at 2:17 pm

What a graceful river tower. begins to have a Arabic or Moorish influence?

Sue February 3, 2015 at 4:16 am

Lyn,

From a National Geographic website I found this explanation…

Moorish architecture is a variation of Islamic architecture. There are many motifs, or repeated patterns, in Moorish architecture.

Moorish architecture is named after the Moors, North African people who conquered the Iberian Peninsula and many islands in the Western Mediterranean beginning in the 700s. The Moors controlled what is now Spain, Portugal, and the Pyrenees region of France for hundreds of years.

The Moors were Muslim and influenced by the Islamic architecture that developed in the Middle East. Although mosques are the most common examples of Moorish architecture, motifs spread to the design of homes and places of businesses. One of the most famous examples of Moorish architecture, the Mezquita or Grand Mosque of Cordoba, Spain, is today the region’s Catholic cathedral.

Lance February 3, 2015 at 8:48 am

Another country I’ve never visited! Thanks for the tour.

Sandy Wilson February 4, 2015 at 5:51 pm

Thanks, Sue and Jay, for your continuing travelogue. I find it fascinating. Your sketches, Sue, add such a lovely personal touch.
I’m appreciating, not complaining, as I sit at a coffee shop in Tweeds Head which is part of Australia’s northeastern coast, about halfway between Byron Bay and Brisbane. Life is good. No chocolate, but I have a latte at my side. :-)

Jen Vollmer February 6, 2015 at 3:48 pm

Just beautiful – photos, your stories, your sketches! Thanks for sharing!

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