Christchurch, NZ

by Sue on March 9, 2010

Revived after our 5 nights in Nelson we are ready to head to Christchurch. Jay was there in November/December of 1975 after a summer gig in Antarctica installing some electronics he had designed for a University of MD atmospheric project. We have been thinking about visiting since then, so I am excited to finally see it, and Jay is curious about how it will appear 35 years later.

Leaving Nelson en route to Christchurch, we decided to check out a couple vineyards around Blenheim. Our favorite for the wine was Lawson’s Dry Hills Winery. Visually very modest compared to others, but producing some lovely white wines. We enjoyed their Pinot Gris, Sauvignon Blanc and Late Harvest Riesling immensely. Decided to buy a bottle of the Pinot Gris to enjoy during the remaining travels and tuck a Riesling away to share with friends back home. During this trip we have driven the coastal routes more often than not, never tiring of our first glimpse of the sea on a new shore. Today we travel down State Highway 1 and experience the South Island’s east coast – this area is known for crayfish, whale watching, seals, dolphins… an abundance of marine life to eat and view. There is stretch of road about 4 km that has signs indicating seals in that area and we spotted a few driving by.

Black Sand Beach on the way to Christ Church, NZ

A black sand beach on the way to Christ Church, NZ

The owner of Lawson Winery had suggested we stop at The Store for lunch. It is midway between Blenheim and Kaikoura in the middle of nowhere, located in a scenic spot along the highway (good signage). They have a large outdoor patio out back where we dined in the sun cooled by the Pacific Ocean breezes and entertained by the most aggressive seagulls we have witnessed yet!

After a fun, full day of traveling we arrive at Pomeroy’s on Kilmore, a boutique guest house located inside Christchurch’s ‘Four Avenues’ (just 4 blocks from the city centre) and our resting point for the next 3 nights. Pomeroy’s historic Old Brewery Inn is literally a stone’s throw away next door and once we are checked in we head over for a brew and dinner. Steve Pomeroy, the owner, is often about and ready to see to your every need. Hearing I eat gluten-free he had fresh gluten-free bread brought in from his favorite German bakery (which he had to do twice, because it was so good all the guests ate it). Another great feature of Pomeroy’s – the breakfast room. Every morning they have a continental breakfast of toast, cereal, tea, coffee, fruit, jams, butter… served in a lovely dining room furnished with antiques. Just like home.

Pomeroy's on Kilmore in Christchurch, NZ

Pomeroy's on Kilmore in Christchurch, NZ

Cathedral Square is a casual 15 minute stroll away – although there are many interesting distractions along the way. Our first evening we took a walk into town after dinner and spotted this sculpture – the next morning Jay returned with camera in hand.

911 tribute in Christ Church, NZ

A sculptural tribute in Christchurch to firemen worldwide.

This sculpture stands within a dedicated reserve opposite the Central Fire Station on the banks of the Avon River, and was created by Christchurch artist, Graham Bennett. It is a silent tribute to firefighters worldwide who risk their lives daily in the pursuit of their duty.

The plaque reminds us that “Firefighters are always in the front line and never more so than on September 11, 2001, when international terrorists hijacked four domestic American jet airliners and flew two of them, along with their passengers, into the twin towers of New York’s World Trade Center. The two towers imploded and collapsed, and among the more than 2800 dead were 343 New York firefighters. All that remained of the twin towers, and the lost lies within was a mountainous pile of twisted steel and smoking rubble. In May 2002, five steel girders, weighing 5.5 tons were salvaged from the site of the World Trade Center and gifted to the City of Christchurch by the city of New York for use in a public artwork to honor all firefighters worldwide. The suspended component or “spear” in its red hot state fell from the 102nd floor of World Trade Center Tower piercing the subway below”.

As Americans who did not witness the carnage in New York City we were deeply moved to find the girders here, half way around the world. And reminded of the horror and disbelief of that day seeing the destruction done to these massive hunks of steel.

Art Center in Christ Church, NZ

An inner court yard at the Art Center in Christ Church, NZ

Exploring Christchurch by foot, we ended up at the Art Center. It is a hub for arts, crafts and entertainment in Christchurch, and is located in the neo-gothic former University of Canterbury buildings. This particular day is was gray and cool, so we were looking for soup, and found some great homemade black bean soup in one of the cafes here. After lunch we checked out some of the artist studios that inhabit many of the buildings and came across a textile class – kids sewing, quilting and weaving. Jay took some great photos – notice the cool quilt on the wall!

Kids making quilts at the Art Center in Christ Church, NZ

Kids making quilts at the Art Center in Christ Church, NZ

Art Center in Christ Church, NZ

A boy learns the art of the loom at the Art Center in Christ Church, NZ

Juggler in Christ Church, NZ

Sculpture of a juggler in Christ Church, NZ

A fine rain began as we walked through the Botanical Gardens on our way back to the room. The flowers photograph well, but I was also struck by the variety and beauty of the numerous old trees.

Botanical Garden in Christ Church, NZ

One of the many gardens at the Botanical Garden in Christ Church, NZ

Roses at the Botanical Garden in Christ Church, NZ

Another day we happened upon a group of Maori performance artists… each woman with a chin tattoo.

Maori Singing in Christ Church, NZ

Traditional Maori performance group in Christ Church, NZ

A little research revealed the following tale…

The word “tattoo” comes from the Tahitian word “tatau”. Captain James Cook used the word “tattow” when he witnessed tattooing for the first time in Tahiti, in 1769.

According to Māori mythology, tattooing commenced with a love affair between a young man by the name of Mataora (which means “Face of Vitality”) and a young princess of the underworld by the name of Niwareka.

One day however, Mataora beat Niwareka, and she left Mataroa, running back to her father’s realm which was named “Uetonga”.

Mataora, filled with guilt and heartbreak followed after his princess Niwareka. After many trials, and after overcoming numerous obstacles, Mataora eventually arrived at the realm of “Uetonga”, but with his face paint messed and dirty after his voyage. Niwareka’s family taunted and mocked Mataora for his bedraggled appearance. In his very humbled state, Mataora begged Niwareka for forgiveness, which she eventually accepted. Niwareka’s father then offered to teach Mataora the art of tattooing, and at the same time Mataora also learnt the art of Taniko – the plaiting of cloak borders in many colours.

Mataora and Niwareka thus returned together to the human world, bringing with them the arts of ta moko and taniko.

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